Genome-wide mapping of gene expression reveals genes that determine human intelligence

Genome sequencing has revealed how genes interact with one another to control the development of human intelligence.

The work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was led by scientists at the Australian National University and the University of Melbourne. 

Geneticists at the universities combined a variety of methods to find the genes responsible for intelligence, from the genes that mediate protein synthesis to the genes which regulate the development and functioning of nerve cells. 

“We were surprised to see that the genes involved in the ability to think are genes that are also involved in intelligence,” said senior author Dr Stephen C. Condon, from Melbourne’s School of Medicine.

Researchers analysed the genes of 2,852 people in the UK, US, Germany, France, Australia and Italy and found that the most common gene involved in learning and memory was the genes encoding the neurotransmitter dopamine. “

This is a bit of a shocker because it’s been suggested that intelligence is a result of genes, but we didn’t really expect to find any genes that influence intelligence.” 

Researchers analysed the genes of 2,852 people in the UK, US, Germany, France, Australia and Italy and found that the most common gene involved in learning and memory was the genes encoding the neurotransmitter dopamine.

They found that there was a correlation between the expression levels of dopamine in the brain and intelligence.

Dr Condon said it was a clear indication that genes could play a role in intelligence.

“It’s important to know that we don’t just find genes that control the ability, but also genes that affect intelligence,” he said.

“It’s not just that the ability is measured by how well we learn or what we can do in school.

Dr Condon explained that the research also uncovered some of the gene variants that were associated with intelligence, suggesting that there might be genetic variants that could help people with the disorder.””

So there are a lot of genes that we can study and we know are involved in that process, and so this work is really going to open up a whole new area of study.” 

Dr Condon explained that the research also uncovered some of the gene variants that were associated with intelligence, suggesting that there might be genetic variants that could help people with the disorder.

“We also found a few that were strongly associated with certain intelligence disorders, like autism,” he added.

“These are genes for a range of cognitive disorders, including autism, and there are some genes that seem to be associated with some intelligence disorders as well.”

Dr Cordon said he hoped to use his work to identify genes that may contribute to a range